Real wood 2018-04-27T13:49:20+00:00

Real Wood, Ideal for Allergy sufferers

Real wood is a great flooring material as it can last for a lifetime when maintained correctly. Wood adds warmth to a building with a feeling of luxury to rooms they are fitted.

Real wood flooring is also one of the most natural floor coverings you can use. Being created from natural material it is an easily sustained making it an environmentally friendly choice too.

The Environment Protection Agency (EPA) states that indoor air quality is dramatically improved in homes which use wood flooring. Being a smooth surface all dirt can be swept away, while chemicals and toxins can be removed with a damp mop. This is good for allergy sufferers and those who have asthma.

Lower life cycle costs

Real wood floors are also affordable, no really…

When you consider the life expectancy of a wooden floor it outlasts carpets and other flooring materials by a huge margin, with regular maintenance a real wood floor can last up to 75 years, most other materials last 20 years, that’s over 2 lifetimes of another material meaning a real wood floor may cost slightly more initially but over time it will save you a lot more than the extra you paid.

What wood types are available?

Laminate wood

Laminate flooring is a multi-layer synthetic flooring product fused together with a lamination process. Laminate flooring simulates wood (or sometimes stone) with a photographic applique layer under a clear protective layer. The inner core layer is usually composed of melamine resin and fiber board materials. There is a European Standard No. EN 13329:2000 specifying laminate floor covering requirements and testing methods.  Generally speaking you can’t sand / repair laminate it must be replaced.

Engineered wood

4-6mm of real milled timber used as the top layer (lamella) which is adhered to the core which is laid at 90° to the top layer, this offers a higher level of structural stability than solid wood which makes it suitable for laying over most subfloors.

Solid wood

Authentic wood flooring made from planks milled from a single piece of timber. Originally solid wood floors were used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. These can be laid without attaching them to the joists as well.

Bamboo wood

Technically not a wood as Bamboo is a form of grass but is an available ‘wood’ floor.

Rustic real wood flooring in living room
White oak real wood flooring
Real wood flooring to bistro

Types of finishes

Hand scraped

Hand scraping was used to smooth out up and down levels in a milled plank, which older machining would create, while not necessary on modern materials it can offer a more dynamic finish with a distinct texture and pattern to the wood, this technique is seen in a lot of upscale homes and commercial buildings.

 Satin lacquer

Satin also known as Semi-Gloss is a good compromise when you’d like a gloss floor but know the flooring may become scratched. The Satin finish hides the marks better than a gloss finish, while still giving a sheen like gloss lacquer.

Unfinished (RAW)

This is a raw finish which hasn’t been stained, oiled or sealed. This gives you the ability to match your real wood floor to your interior decoration, this is an open surface and susceptible to staining and watermarking until a finish is applied.

Matte lacquer

Authentic wood flooring made from planks milled from a single piece of timber. Originally solid wood floors were used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. These can be laid without attaching them to the joists as well.

Brushed & Oiled

Before finishing the material it is brushed with abrasive rollers to remove some of the soft grain, this highlights the pattern of the wood creating a natural rustic texture, it is then oiled you’ve probably seen this in Starbucks

Oiled only

Timber can be oiled instead of lacquered, these oils are generally translucent in colour unless a dyed oil is used, the oil sinks into the timber generally many layers down protecting it from dirt and dust. These oils must be reapplied periodically, the main benefit of oil is any damaged areas can be touched up without requiring major work.